Posted by: Aqua Vista | October 5, 2009

Effects of the Station Fire

Please forgive the tardiness of this post.  I have been out of town for weeks…

This may be obvious for those in the immediate area, but for those in other areas of  the town, this may still be news.  Despite the close proximity of the Station Fire to several hikes in the Burbank/Glendale area, I am happy to report that the few that I have trekked recently have had no substantial damage and are open to hikers and bikers.

Stough Canyon in Burbank – OPEN

Wildwood Canyon in Burbank – OPEN and untouched

Brand Park  in Glendale – OPEN and untouched

Beaudry Loop in Glendale – OPEN and untouched

Have any information about other trails in the area?  Please let us know!

Advertisements
Posted by: Aqua Vista | June 17, 2009

80% of California State Parks may be closed?!!!

When I heard of this today, It felt like I was kicked in the gut.  Certainly Arnold and the legislature couldn’t possibly have mismanaged things this badly.  Could they?   What happened?  Did they invest all of the state revenue in the stock market?  Were they one of the Madoff clients that haven’t been mentioned?  Did Arnold take his 15 billion dollar “let’s pay for all of Enron’s sins” bond to Vegas and put it all on black?  I find it hard to believe that after a decade of nothing but budget cuts, added taxes, fees, fines and a real estate market that tripled in value, that we are worse off than we were back then.  Even after discounting the fact that real estate has recently retracted 30%, it just doesn’t add up.  Where did the money go?  It sure didn’t go into our roads or schools.    I don’t even want to think about what this might mean to hikers and campers in this state.  The state of California needs to be audited.

Posted by: Aqua Vista | May 10, 2009

Dearing Mountain Trail

Fire road entrance on Iredell Lane.
Fire road entrance on Iredell Lane.

If you’re looking for solitude and a hike on a real path instead of a fire road, the Dearing Mountain Trail in Studio City is a great option. It is a narrow, sometimes overgrown trail full of mild ascents and descents, with nice views of the valley and believe it or not – a rain forest!

DISTANCE: 3.6 miles round trip

ELEVATION GAIN: 400 feet

TIME: 1.5 TO 2 hours

The trail starts out in a residential area on a fire road off of Iredell Lane right next to Wilacre Park. After a few hundred feet you will come to a junction marked by a Santa Monica Mountains park sign (shown here)

  • First junction.
  • First junction.
  • Dearing IMG_1389Dearing IMG_1390 Turn left at the junction and you will encounter a quick ascent via railroad tie steps and a thin sometimes overgrown path. After about ten minutes you will come to a plateau with great views of the valley.

    Dearing IMG_1392

    View from plateau.
    View from plateau.

    After rounding a bend after the plateau, you will soon descend down into the rain forest area and the bottom of a valley.

    Dearing IMG_1396

    Descent into rain forest area.
    Descent into rain forest area.

    After about 30 minutes of hiking you will arrive at a fallen tree and a small bridge. A few feet after the bridge you will also stumble upon a hanging swing. (I never tried the swing and have no idea how safe it is)

    Valley floor
    Valley floor
    Small bridge on valley floor.
    Small bridge on valley floor.
    Hanging swing near the valley floor.
    Hanging swing near the valley floor.

    After a few more minutes, you will come to another junction. Take the path to the right, marked with a “Dearing Mountain Trail” sign post. This will take you up briefly, before taking you back and down again, where you will come upon an old car wreck.

  • Second junction/to the right.
  • Second junction/to the right.
  • Old car wreck.
  • Old car wreck.
  • From here you will come out of the shade for a while and zig zag your way up to the mountain to a lookout park on Mulholland Drive. From there, just retrace your steps.

    Last turn before Mulholland.

    Last turn before Mulholland

    Parking lot on Mulholland.

    Parking lot on Mulholland.

    Looking down on the valley.

    Looking down on the valley.

    To get to this hike, you can either start from Iredell or Mulholland.  To start from Iredell, you must know that there is no parking at the fire road entrance on Iredell.  The closest legal parking is at the Tree People parking lot on the corner of Coldwater and Mulholland.  From that parking lot, head into Coldwater Canyon park and descend a few flights of steps onto Barker Fire Road.  Here take a right and hike several hundred meters down to Iridell.  Walk down the paved street a few hundred feet.  You will notice the fire road entrance on your right.
    To start out from Mulholland, you will find the lookout parking lot on the north side of Mulholland Drive in between Laurel Canyon and Coldwater Canyon.
    Posted by: Aqua Vista | May 7, 2009

    Great Time of Year

    I you haven’t gotten out to hike recently, you should. Despite the drought we find ourselves in, springtime has brought lush vegetation all over the mountains. Make sure you get out before summer dries it all up!

    IMG_1293

    IMG_1302

    IMG_1326

    IMG_1338

    IMG_1364

    Posted by: Aqua Vista | May 7, 2009

    Stough Canyon Hike #1

    Yesterday was an amazing day for a good hike. I traveled to the north end of Burbank to one of my favorite hikes above the Stough Canyon Nature Center, located adjacent to the northwest end of the DeBell Golf Course.

    trail head
    trail head

    DISTANCE: 2.5 miles (est)

    TIME: 55 to 70 minutes

    ELEVATION GAIN: 700 feet

    DIFFICULTY: easy/moderate

    Starting off just to the left of the Stough Canyon Nature Center on Stough Canyon Avenue, you will start off on the Verdugo Fire Road and ascend for about 10 minutes until the you run into the first junction. Turn left here and go another couple hundred feet to another junction. From here you can turn left and travel up to the first lookout, or head right, where you will wind your way up the fire road a few hundred more feet until you hit a more narrow path that runs along a ridge. Here are a few views from this area….

    Looking right or east early on in the hike.
    Looking right or east early on in the hike.
    Looking back toward the valley as the fire road turns into a path.
    Looking back toward the valley as the fire road turns into a path.

    As you continue to ascend the mountain, the views get better and better.

    img_13332

    After about 5 more minutes you will wind around the face of the mountain along a narrow and sometimes overgrown footpath, and come to the ruins of an old boy’s camp on a plateau.

    Ruins of an old camp.

    Ruins of an old camp.

    From here proceed straight to a hill across the plateau marked by a sign post pointing to the “Verdugo Fire Road”.

    Stough CanyonIMG_1345

    Hill just past the ruins and the plateau.

    Hill just past the ruins and the plateau.

    After you wind around the hill, you will encounter breathtaking views of the Angeles National Forest just past the 210 freeway, before running into the Verdugo Fire Road.

    View of The Angeles National Forest in the distance.

    View of The Angeles National Forest in the distance

    Here is where the path ends as you meet the fire road.

    Here is where the path ends as you meet the fire road.

    After the path ends and merges back with the fire road, head left, or west. You will wind along the ridge for a few minutes, passing a lookout bench. This is a great place to stop and take in the view, but you should continue on another few minutes. Look for a lone tree on a bluff to the left of the fire road. This, “one tree hill” has a picnic table with a tackle box that contains a “sign in log” for all the visitors to this spot. Here are pictures of the approach.

    First lookout bench after you leave the path.
    First lookout bench after you leave the path.
    Approach to the "One Tree Hill".
    Approach to the “One Tree Hill”
    Your destination.
    Your destination.
    View from the picnic bench.  Tacle box/sign in journal in view.
    View from the picnic bench. Tacle box/sign in journal in view.

    After taking it all in, you can retrace your steps back the way you came, or just follow the Verdugo Fire Road back down completing a loop. Just follow the sign posts with arrows toward “Nature Center”. Here are a few views of the fire road on the way back.

    Going back.
    Going back.
    Verdugo Fire Road.
    Verdugo Fire Road.
    Fire road at a junction right before the main descent.

    Fire road at a junction right before the main descent.

    View of the final descent.  DeBell Golf course visible on the left.

    View of the final descent. DeBell Golf course visible on the left.

    Posted by: Aqua Vista | May 7, 2009

    Hastain Trail in Franklin Canyon

    Posted by: Aqua Vista | April 28, 2009

    Devil Canyon

    It has been brought to my attention that entrance to the Devil Canyon hike, located just north of the 118 freeway at Topanga Canyon Blvd and Poema Place has been obstructed by a real estate development. I haven’t been able to get up there lately, so I don’t know if the trail is accessible anymore. Anybody with information on this, please let me know!

    Posted by: Aqua Vista | April 28, 2009

    Dante’s View

    Dante's View

    Dante's View

    Dante's View

    For those of you who haven’t ventured to the Mt. Hollywood Trail above the Griffith Observatory since the big fire, my wife is happy to report that Dante’s View and the surrounding area has made a nice comeback. Nearby vegetation is rejuvenated, and in some places you can’t tell that there was ever a fire at all. Hear are a few pictures….img_12122

    A rare mid-afternoon Coyote sighting in Griffith Park

    A rare mid-afternoon Coyote sighting in Griffith Park....

    Posted by: Aqua Vista | April 27, 2009

    Hello Fellow Hikers!

    Yes, yet another hiking blog about Los Angeles has been constructed. Hiking Los Angles! We look forward to logging our hiking experiences and want to hear about yours. Feel free to post here or email us at (aquavistaprods@gmail.com) about your recent hiking experiences and any current trail conditions that you may want to warn others about. We hope to keep accurate updates on any trail in the L.A. area, even those we haven’t had the pleasure to trek.

    Happy Trails!

    Categories